How PSD2 is set to change banking up as we know it …

Fig. 1 – A prophetic vision by Bill Gates!? – Taken from: https://www.slideshare.net/patrickpijl/how-square-is-disrupting-banks/6-Bill_GatesBANKING_ISNECESSARYBANKS_ARENOT

“Banking is necessary.  Banks are not.”  Yep. Bill Gates said it. Back in 1994. And 28 years later, it’s it’s set to become reality. From the 1st January 2018, banking will no longer be the exclusive domain of banking institutions because PSD2 is going to drastically alter the way in which we bank.

The biggest consequence is that more than 4,000 European banks will need to open their legacy (mainframe) data stores to Third Party Players (‘TPPs’) and allow them to retrieve account information (‘AIS’) or initiate payments (‘PIS’). Both capabilities will be facilitated through APIs. I wrote about the scope and ramifications of PSD2 a few months ago, and I’ve been thinking ever since about the implications for existing banks and whether they’ve got reason to be scared.

It would be surprising if some of the traditional banks weren’t nervous about the extent to which they’ll have to open their kimonos under PSD2. And even if the Facebooks, Googles or Amazons of this world don’t become banks overnight, I expect the traditional, lifelong bank-customer relationship to slowly evaporate as a result of PSD2 (and subsequent versions of PSD).

Fig. 2 – PwC: PSD2 providing third party access to data and payments via APIs – Taken from: https://www.finextra.com/finextra-downloads/newsdocs/catalyst-or-threat.pdf

Facebook could easily decide to become an AISP (Account Information Service Provider – see Fig. 2 above), which would enable them to offer an aggregated view of a user’s bank accounts. As a result, they would be able to analyse spending behaviour, understand their users’ financial profiles and personalise a user’s banking experience. This isn’t that revolutionary, as virtual assistants like Cleo and Treefin have already starting offering this functionality, and I believe it’s highly likely that we’ll see it roll out across Facebook Messenger or WeChat in the near future. If you need more convincing, Facebook made their first move two years ago by appointing David Marcus, former CEO of PayPal, to head up Facebook Messenger, so watch this space. Similarly, US bank Capital One integrated with Amazon’s virtual assistant Alexa last year. This integration enables Capital One customers to pay their credit card bills and check their balances, by talking to their Alexa devices.

Fig. 3 – PwC: Six API-powered banking business models – Taken from: https://www.finextra.com/finextra-downloads/newsdocs/catalyst-or-threat.pdf

In addition, any remaining doubters about the power of APIs are likely to be converted as a result of PSD2. In the current Fintech landscape, there already are large number of banks that are either using APIs to hook into existing banking infrastructures (e.g. Varo Money) or offer additional services (e.g. N26). PwC recently conducted a study into the strategic implications of PSD2 for European banks and they listed no less than six API-powered banking business models (see Fig. 3 above).

Main learning point: It will be interesting to see what the actual impact of PSD2 will be, but if I were a traditional European bank, I’d be working as hard as I could to open up my APIs from today and start working on the creation of strong alliances with 3rd parties and their developers. As Nas once rapped on “N.Y. State Of Mind”, “I never sleep cause sleep is the cousin of the death.” If I were a traditional bank I’d follow Nas’ advice and give up on sleep completely …

Nas, lyric on “N.Y. State of Mind (Illmatic, 1994) – Taken from: https://uk.pinterest.com/MrConceptz/hiphop-101/

 

Related links for further learning:

  1. https://www.finextra.com/blogposting/14101/psd2-is-fast-approaching-dont-bury-your-head-in-the-sand
  2. https://www.finextra.com/videoarticle/1469/data-is-a-key-legal-issue-for-open-banking
  3. https://techcrunch.com/2017/01/12/what-facebooks-european-payment-license-could-mean-for-banks/
  4. http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/apple-facebook-amazon-primed-psd2-demolition-card-networks-1606188
  5. https://www.siliconrepublic.com/enterprise/fintech-banking-psd2
  6. http://www.bankingtech.com/675841/psd2-and-the-future-of-payments/
  7. https://www.evry.com/en/news/articles/psd2-the-directive-that-will-change-banking-as-we-know-it/
  8. http://www.sepaforcorporates.com/single-euro-payments-area/5-things-need-know-psd2-payment-services-directive/
  9. https://techcrunch.com/2015/07/12/the-future-of-finance-is-in-real-time/
  10. https://www.finextra.com/finextra-downloads/newsdocs/catalyst-or-threat.pdf
  11. http://www.pymnts.com/news/b2b-payments/2015/task-force-launches-eu-instant-payment-plan/.VYpo1rnhBTI
  12. https://venturebeat.com/2016/06/05/say-hello-to-messenger-banking/
  13. https://www.finextra.com/newsarticle/28602/capital-one-integrates-with-amazon-alexa-for-voice-powered-payments

 

My product management toolkit (18): Keeping an eye on consumer trends

As a product manager, I know how easy it can be to get trapped into the every day and lose sight of what the future could bring. We tend to get immersed in the more tactical, day-to-day stuff and forget about the bigger picture. Also, there’s a daily avalanche of new technology developments and market trends, and it can be tempting to act on the latest trend, out of sheer fear to miss out. But how do you know whether it’s worth following up on a specific trend!?

A few months ago I learned more about how to best identify and assess trends by listening to a podcast with Max Luthy – Director of Trends & Insights at TrendWatching. TrendWatching have developed this very handy framework in the “Trend Canvas” (see Fig. 1 below).

 

screen-shot-2016-12-28-at-16-50-02

Fig. 1 – The Trend Canvas by TrendWatching – Taken from: http://trendwatching.com/x/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/2014-05-CONSUMER-TREND-CANVAS1.pdf

The Trend Canvas distinguishes between the “Analyze” and the “Apply” stages. During the Analyze stage, you assess a trend and its underlying drivers. What are the basic consumer needs a trend is serving and why? What kinds of change is this trend driving and why? In contrast, during the Apply stage you’ll look at ways in which you and your business can best tap into a trend, and who would benefit from this trend.

I’ve found the Trend Canvas to be very useful when exploring and assessing trends. The thing I like most about this framework is that it forces you to think about the customer and how a customer is impacted by a particular trend. Let’s take the trend of electric cars as a good example:

 

electric-smart-car

Fig. 2 – Smart Electric Drive – Taken from: https://cleantechnica.com/2015/07/31/11-electric-cars-with-most-range-list/

 Analyse trends

  1. Basic needs – What deep consumer needs & desires does this trend address? – I haven’t spoken to many electric car owners yet, but the ones that I’ve spoken to mention “environmental consciousness” and “cost saving” as the basic needs that drove their purchase of an electric car. The experts at TrendWatching mention some other typical types of basic of needs worth considering as part of your analysis (see Fig. 3 below).
  2. Drivers of Change – Why is this trend emerging now? – What’s changing? – To analyse the drivers of change, it’s worth looking at ‘shifts’ and ‘triggers’. Shifts are the long-term, macro changes that often take years or decades to fully materialise. For example, a rapidly growing global middle class and increasing scarcity of oil are significant drivers of the appeal of electric cars (this report contains some interesting insights in this regard). Triggers are the more immediate changes that drive the emergence of a consumer trend. These can include specific technologies, political events, economic shocks and environmental incidents. I feel that recent improvements to both the technology and infrastructure with regard to electric cars are important triggers.
  3. Emerging Consumer Expectations – What new consumer needs, wants and expectations are created by the changes identified above? – Where and how does this trend satisfy them? – Purchasing expensive fuel for your car is no longer a given, and consumers starting to become much aware of the cheaper and environmentally friendly alternative in electric cars.
  4. Inspiration – How are other businesses applying this trend? – When analysing a trend, a key part of the analysis involves looking at how incumbent businesses are applying a trend. For example, the Renault-Nissan alliance has thus far been the most successful when it comes to electric cars and learning about the ‘why’ behind their success will help one’s own trend analysis.

Fig. 3 – Basic needs categories to consider when analysing trends – Taken from: http://trendwatching.com/x/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/2014-05-CONSUMER-TREND-CANVAS1.pdf

  • Social status
  • Self-improvement
  • Entertainment
  • Excitement
  • Connection
  • Security
  • Identity
  • Relevance
  • Social interaction
  • Creativity
  • Fairness
  • Honesty
  • Freedom
  • Recognition
  • Simplicity
  • Transparency

 Apply trends

  1. Innovation Panel – How and where could you apply this trend to your business? – To me, this is one of the crucial steps when exploring trends; asking yourself that all important question – how can I best apply this trend to my business? For example, how does a specific trend fit in with our current offering of products and services? Why (not)? It’s similar to when you assess a product opportunity and go through a number of questions to look at the viability of a trend for your business (see Fig. 4 below).
  2. Who? Which (new) customer groups could you apply this trend to? What would you have to change? – How often do we forget to think properly about who this trend is for and why they benefit from it. Which demographic is this trend relevant for and why? For instance, with electric cars, one could think about middle class families who are very cost and environmentally conscious consumers.

Fig. 4 – Assessing “Innovation Panel” when applying trends – Taken from: http://trendwatching.com/x/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/2014-05-CONSUMER-TREND-CANVAS1.pdf

  • Vision: How will the deeper shifts underlying this trend shape your company’s long-term vision?
  • Business Model: Can you apply this trend to launch a whole new business venture or brand?
  • Product / Service / Experience: What new products and services could you create in light of this trend? How will you adapt your current products and services?
  • Campaign: How can you incorporate this trend into your campaigns, and show consumers you speak their language, that you ‘get it’.

Main learning point: The Trend Canvas provides a great way for anyone to assess trends and innovations, looking at a trend from both a consumer and a business point of view.

 

Related links for further learning:

  1. http://productinnovationeducators.com/blog/tei-083-trend-driven-innovation-for-product-managers-with-max-luthy/
  2. http://blog.euromonitor.com/2012/11/10-global-macro-trends-for-the-next-five-years.html
  3. http://trendwatching.com/trends/pointknowbuy/
  4. https://about.bnef.com/blog/liebreich-mccrone-electric-vehicles-not-just-car/
  5. http://trendwatching.com/trends/cleanslatebrands/
  6. http://www.cheatsheet.com/automobiles/10-car-companies-that-sell-the-most-electric-vehicles.html/
  7. http://www.cheatsheet.com/automobiles/the-10-best-selling-electric-vehicles-of-2014.html/

My product management toolkit (17): Assess market viability

Whether you’re a product manager or are in a commercial or strategic role, I’m sure you’ll have to assess market viability at some point in your career. For that reason, I wrote previously about assessing markets, suggesting tools that you can use to decide on whether to enter a market or not.

A few weeks ago, I listened to a podcast interview in which Christophe Gillet, VP of Product Management at Vimeo, gave some great pointers on how to best assess market viability. Christophe shared his thoughts on things to explore when considering market viability. I’ve added my sample questions related to some of the points that Christophe made:

  1. Is there a market? – This should be the first validation in my opinion; is there a demand for my product or service? Which market void will our product help to fill and why? What are the characteristics of my target market?
  2. Is there viability within that market?  Once you’ve established that there’s a potential market for your product, this doesn’t automatically mean that the market is viable. For example, regulatory constraints can make it hard to launch or properly establish your product in a market.
  3. Total addressable market – The total addressable market – or total available market – is all about revenue opportunity available for a particular product or service (see Fig. 1 below). A way to work out the total addressable market is to first define total market space and then look at percentage of the market which has already been served.
  4. Problem to solve – Similar to some of the questions to ask as part of point 1. above, it’s important to validate early and often whether there’s an actual problem that your product or service is solving.
  5. Understand prior failures (by competitors) – I’ve found that looking at previous competitor attempts can be an easy thing to overlook. However, understanding who already tried to conquer your market of choice and whether they’ve been successful can help you avoid some pitfalls that others encountered before you.
  6. Talk to individual users  I feel this is almost a given if you’re looking to validate whether there’s a market and a problem to solve (see points 1. and 4. above). Make sure that you sense check your market and problem assumptions with your target customers.
  7. Strong mission statement and objectives of what you’re looking to achieve  In my experience, having a clear mission statement helps to articulate and communicate what it is that you’re looking to achieve and why. These mission statements are typically quite aspirational but should offer a good insight into your aspirations for a particular market (see the example of outdoor clothing company Patagonia in Fig. 2 below).
  8. Business goals  Having clear, measurable objectives in place to achieve in relation to a new market that you’re considering is absolutely critical. In my view, there’s nothing worse than looking at new markets without a clear definition of what market success looks like and why.
  9. How to get people to use your product – I really liked how Christophe spoke about the need to think about a promotion and an adoption strategy. Too often, I encounter a ‘build it and they will come’ kind of mentality which I believe can be deadly if you’re looking to enter new markets. Having a clear go-to-market strategy is almost just as important as developing a great product or service. What’s the point of an awesome product that no one knows about or doesn’t know where to get!?

Main learning point: Listening to the interview with Christophe Gillet reinforced for me the importance of being able to assess market viability. Being able to ask and explore some critical questions when considering new markets will help avoid failed launches or at least gain a shared understanding of what market success will look like.

 

Fig. 1 – Total available market – Taken from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Total_addressable_market

1000px-tam-sam-market

Fig. 2 – Patagonia’s mission statement – Taken from: http://www.patagonia.com/company-info.html

screen-shot-2017-01-20-at-07-21-29

Related links for further learning:

  1. http://www.thisisproductmanagement.com/episodes/assessing-market-viability
  2. http://www.mindtheproduct.com/2013/05/poem-framework/
  3. http://smallbusiness.chron.com/determine-market-viability-product-service-40757.html
  4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Total_addressable_market
  5. https://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/inspiring-company-mission-statements

App review: Zuora

One of the product areas I’m keen to learn more about is billing; understanding how small businesses go about (recurring) billing. A few years ago, I used Recurly to power subscription management and payments for a music streaming service. I’ve now discovered Zuora, who aspire to “turn your customers into subscribers.”

“The world subscribed” – I really like Zuora’s vision – “the world subscribed” – and its 9 keys to building a subscription based business (see Fig. 2 below). Zuora aims to make managing subscription payments as intuitive as possible. For example, when I look at the info that Zuora provides on a specific customer account, it feels clear and clean, enabling the user to digest key account information at a glance (see Fig. 3 below).

Part of an ecosystem – The thing I like best about Zuora is the numerous integrations it has with partners and marketplace apps. As a result, Zuora users can integrate easily with payment gateways such as Adyen and link with accounting software packages such as QuickBooks. Similarly, there’s a whole host of apps and plug-ins that Zuora users can choose from.

Main learning point: Even though subscription management / billing forms the core of Zuora’s value proposition, I feel that there’s much more to it: helping people run their business operations as efficiently as possible. I don’t know whether the people at Zuora would agree with me on this vision, but I believe that, especially through it’s 3rd party integrations, Zuora can support its users more widely in their day-to-day operations.

Fig. 1 – Screenshot of Zuora’s “Quotes” overview – Taken from: https://www.getapp.com/finance-accounting-software/a/zuora/

9966-1523463673

Fig. 2 – Zuora’s 9 keys to building a subscription based business – Taken from: https://www.zuora.com/vision/the-9-keys/

  1. Price – Find your sweet spot. Dynamically adjusting pricing and packaging is the surest way to attract and retain customers, and multiply the value of your relationships.
  2. Acquire – Boost subscription rates with tools like flexible promotions, integrated quoting and multi-channel commerce.
  3. Bill – Subscriptions mean more invoices and more payments. Automatically generate fast, accurate bills and deliver them online.
  4. Collect – Get paid. Collect payments instantly through automated and manual channels, while maximising completed transactions and minimising write-offs.
  5. Nurture – Build beautiful relationships. Keep your customers engaged and happy. Seamlessly manage rapidly changing upgrades, conversions, renewals and other orders.
  6. Account – Measure everything. Twice. Zuora plugs straight into your accounting software and General Ledger. Register subscription and process deferred revenue with ease.
  7. Measure – No paper, no worries. Analytics make forecasting, accounting close and audits a breeze. Plus, it gives you the right insight your subscribers, so you can make smarter decisions.
  8. Iterate – Try something new every day. Subscriptions can involve complex customer relationships. Zuora lets you iterate and test what’s working with just a couple of clicks.
  9. Scale – Get growing. Zuora is built on a secure, scalable technology infrastructure. So wherever you start out, we’ll keep the system running as you grow.
Fig. 3 –  Screenshot of Zuora’s “Customer Accounts” page – Taken from: https://www.crunchbase.com/organization/zuora#/entity
zuora-1
Related links for further learning:
  1. https://www.boomi.com/solutions/zuora/
  2. https://www.zuora.com/product/partners/
  3. https://connect.zuora.com/appstore/apps
  4. http://fortune.com/2014/06/10/10-questions-tien-tzuo-founder-and-ceo-zuora/
  5. http://www.forbes.com/sites/edmundingham/2015/10/13/why-own-anything-anymore-zuora-founder-explains-rise-of-subscription-economy-at-subscribed-ldn/#735812d65a49
  6. http://blog.servicerocket.com/podcasts/episode-7
  7. https://www.zendesk.com/customer/zuora/
  8. https://medium.com/the-mission/the-greatest-sales-deck-ive-ever-seen-4f4ef3391ba0#.xbezrudzi

My product management toolkit (14): Product Portfolio Planning

One of the key things that I’ve had to learn over the last couple of years is how to best manage a portfolio of products. When I started out as a product manager, I could focus on a single product and was fully accountable for the performance of that product. However, as time has gone by, I’ve found myself becoming responsible for a range of products, and having to make tough trade-off decisions between them. Being able to manage a portfolio of products is therefore an important skill to have in your toolkit as a product manager:

  1. What is a product portfolio? – A set of products, services or features that a company offers and which often need to be managed simultaneously.
  2. What is product portfolio management? – Managing a portfolio of products is all about a balanced allocation of resources – people, time, money, hardware, etc. – to achieve business goals. It’s all about “value maximisation” as new product development expert Carrie Nauyalis called out in a recent podcast.
  3. Types of product portfolio: top down – “Top down” portfolios are typically more strategic, with a ‘programme of work’ at the top (see Fig. 1 below). For example, the business might be looking to deliver products or services into a new market. These are often conscious decisions, taken at the executive level of an organisation.
  4. Types of product portfolio: bottom-up – With “Bottom up” portfolios, the strategy is often coming from customer requests – both with regard to B2C and B2B products or services – and tends to be more tactical. For example, customers asking for specific features to meet their needs or to solve their specific products.
  5. It’s all about analysing trade-offs and decision making! – Some product people use a Stage-Gate approach to create and manage a balanced portfolio, and to help make tough prioritisation and trade-off decisions (see Fig. 2). I personally don’t use the Stage-Gate approach, since I work in more a iterative and continuous fashion, but to me it’s all about linking to key goals and results that the business is looking to achieve, and making hard trade-off decisions on the back of these data points (see Fig. 3 below).
  6. Use data to make your trade-off decisions and evaluate product portfolio performance – As the aforementioned Carrie Nauyalis explained in the podcast, the ultimate role of having a product portfolio is to analyse. Looking at performance of the different products within a portfolio and understanding how they each attribute to key business goals. Reason why I believe it’s critical to include metrics in your product portfolio roadmap – you can see a good example of this in Roman Pichler‘s template for a goal-oriented product portfolio roadmap (see Fig. 3 below).

Main learning point: I don’t feel like you need a whole new toolkit just to manage a suite of product or services. What I’ve learned about managing product portfolios is that it brings difficult trade-off questions to the fore more. Having a clear, goal-oriented product portfolio roadmap will help you in analysing  trade-offs better and making well-informed decisions.

 

Fig. 1 – Top down vs Bottom up approach to portfolio management – Taken from: https://www.sopheon.com/top-down-vs-bottom-up-resource-planning-which-is-better/

screen-shot-2016-10-17-at-08-54-30

Fig. 2 – The standard Stage-Gate approach to product innovation – Taken from: http://www.stage-gate.com/resources_stage-gate_omicron.php

img_chart_nov

Fig. 3 – A goal-oriented product portfolio roadmap – Taken from: http://www.romanpichler.com/blog/the-go-portfolio-roadmap/

the-go-porfolio-roadmap-template

Related links for further learning:

  1. http://www.planview.com/solutions/product-development/product-portfolio-management-for-product-development/
  2. http://www.prod-dev.com/portfolio_management.php
  3. http://www.stage-gate.net/downloads/wp/wp_13.pdf
  4. http://www.romanpichler.com/blog/the-go-portfolio-roadmap/
  5. http://www.productinnovationeducators.com/blog/tei-084-product-portfolio-management-with-carrie-nauyalis/
  6. https://www.sopheon.com/top-down-vs-bottom-up-resource-planning-which-is-better/

 

Book review: Sprint (Part 2 – Day 1)

In my previous post I started looking at doing 5-day sprints to discover and test solutions for a problem that you’re trying to solve. This follows my reading of “Sprint” by Jake Knapp, John Zeratsky and Braden Kowitz. Once you’ve set the stage for a sprint, it’s time to kick things off: the first day of a sprint is all about agreeing on the challenge that you’re looking to have tackled by the end of the sprint. On the Monday, i.e. the first day of the sprint, the focus is on the following activities: (1) agreeing on a long-term goal (2) making a map of the challenge (3) asking experts and (4) picking a target.

Agree on a long-term goal (‘start at the end’)

You start the sprint by asking the the team “why”, make sure everyone is on the same page about what we’re trying to achieve. Why do we want to create this product? Why are we doing this project? Why do we want to solve this problem? Where do we want to be in 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, even 5 years from now and why? What will success look like? Agreeing on a long term will bring the answers together in a shared purpose.

Once you’ve got a shared understanding of the underlying “why” and have set a long-term goal, you come up with number of specific sprint questions, which you can derive from the assumptions and questions that the team might have. To get the team thinking about some of these questions, you can use the following prompts:

  • What questions do we want to ask in this sprint and why?
  • How will we subsequently utilise the answers to these sprint questions and outcomes?
  • To meet our long-term goal, what has to be true?
  • Imagine we travel into the future and our product or project failed. What might have caused that failure? How can we best mitigate this risk?
  • To reach customers for this product, what has to be true?
  • To deliver value to these customers, what has to be true?

Fig. 1 – Sample long term goal and sprint questions:

Long term goal: More people buying snacks online.

Sprint questions:

  • Are people looking to buy snacks online?
  • What is the experience customers are looking for when buying snacks online?

Map the challenge

Challange Map

Fig. 2 – Example of a Challenge Map: Flatiron Health’s clinical trial enrolment map – Taken from: https://zapier.com/blog/google-ventures-design-sprint/

Creating a map is a great way to understand the steps the customer has to go through to achieve a desired outcome (see a good example in Fig. 2 above). Each map is customer-centric, with a list of key actors on the left. Each map is a story, with a beginning, a middle and an end. These are the common elements of a Challenge Map:

  1. List the actors (on the left) – The “actors” are all the important characters in your story. Most often, they’re different kinds of customers.
  2. Write the ending (on the right) – Write the outcome that the customer wants to achieve.
  3. Words and arrows in between – There’s no need for any fancy drawings; the map should be functional, and simple boxes and arrows should suffice.
  4. Keep it simple – Your map should have from five to around fifteen steps. If there are more than twenty, your map is probably too complicated.
  5. Ask for help – As you create the map, you should keep asking the team, “Does this map look right?” or “What are we missing?”

Ask the Experts

Nobody knows everything and it’s therefore critical that you engage with a range of ‘experts’. One of the biggest challenges of running a sprint is that you’ve got to gather a lot of information and make sense of it in a relatively short space of time. Having short conversations – approx. 30 minutes per conversation – with experts will help massively in collating relevant detail quickly.

Pick a Target

Selecting one target customer and one target event is the final activity of the first day of the sprint. The Decider needs to decide on the target customer and the customer event. Whatever she chooses will become the focus of the rest of the sprint – the sketches, prototype, and customer interviews all flow from this decision. Naturally, this can be a group decision, but it helps to assign decision-making responsibility to a single person.

Once you’ve selected a target, take a look back at your sprint questions. You usually can’t answer all those questions in one sprint, but one or more should line up with the target.

Main learning point: The first day of the sprint should really lay the groundwork for the rest of the sprint. Avoid the temptation to dive straight into solutions. Instead, spend the first day of the sprint to agree on a long-term goal and selecting a specific target to focus on!

Related links for further learning:

  1. http://www.nirandfar.com/2016/03/good-products-start-good-questions.html
  2. http://blog.invisionapp.com/inside-design-google-ventures/
  3. https://stfalcon.com/en/blog/post/how-to-quickly-check-startup-ideas-with-sprint

Book review: Sprint (Part 1 – Setting the stage)

I personally find it very encouraging to see that more and more companies go down the route of experimentation and continuous discovery. Businesses are starting to realise that committing to a single solution upfront and implementing it in the hope that it will be successful can be a very risky strategy. “Sprint – How To Solve Big Problems and Test New Ideas in Just Five Days” builds on this change by introducing the concept of a 5-day sprint in which to identify problems, explore possible solutions AND get feedback from real customers.

Jake Knapp and two of his colleagues at Google Ventures, John Zeratsky and Braden Kowitz, have successfully applied ‘sprints’ for a wide range of companies, helping the likes of Pocket and Blue Bottle to tackle difficult problems in just five days. This is how the five days are broken down:

  • Monday (day 1) – ‘Start at the end’; agree to a long-term goal and pick a problem to solve during the sprint
  • Tuesday (day 2)  Review and improve existing ideas and sketch possible solutions
  • Wednesday (day 3) – Select a solution to focus on and create a storyboard
  • Thursday (day 4) – Build a prototype, a realistic ‘facade’
  • Friday (day 5) – Learn through customer interviews

Sprint 1

Fig. 1 – Steven Nguyen “Reflecting on our first design sprint” – Taken from: https://sprintstories.com/reflecting-on-our-first-design-sprint-2d58519eefad#.ej6ivw4ma

The “Sprint” book contains a wealth of great techniques to utilise as part of a sprint. I want to do it justice and will probably devote a couple of posts to this great book. Before delving into each of the days of the sprint, let’s start by looking at ‘setting the stage’ before kicking off the sprint. It’s important to have the right challenge and the right team before you begin a sprint:

  • Challenge – As readers of my posts might know; I’m quite obsessed about understanding the problem(s) worth solving before exploring solutions. I therefore believe that picking the right problem or challenge to solve is absolutely critical to a successful sprint. Knapp, Zeratsky and Kowitz suggest three challenging situations where sprints can help: high stakes, tight deadlines or when you’re simply stuck.
  • Team – The key thing when assembling a sprint team is to get a ‘Decider’ in the team; someone who’s in a position to make important decisions. This can be the CEO or another important stakeholder. I like how the book provides a number of arguments one can use when a Decider is reluctant to get involved in the sprint (see Fig. 2 below). You should end up with a well balanced team, made up of people who can implement as well as subject matter experts (see Fig. 3 below).

On top of picking a team, it’s also important to have a designated facilitator who can manage time, conversations, and the overall process. Naturally, this can be someone from within your company or someone external. For example, I know lots of digital agencies that facilitate sprints as part of a piece of work for their clients. As much this is beneficial to the client, this also helps the agency by creating a shared and robust understanding of what’s going to be built and why.

Fig. 2 – Get a Decider (or two) involved – Taken from: “Sprint”, pp. 31-32

  • Rapid progress – Emphasise the amount of progress you’ll make in your sprint: In just one week, you’ll have a realistic prototype.
  • It’s an experiment – Consider your first sprint an experiment. When it’s over, the Decider can help evaluate how effective it was.
  • Explain the tradeoffs – Show the Decider a list of big meetings and work items you and your team will miss during the sprint week.
  • It’s about focus – Be honest about your motivations. If the quality of your work is suffering because your team’s regular work schedule is too scattered, say so. Tell the Decider that instead of doing an okay job on everything, you’ll do an excellent job on one thing.

Fig. 3 – Recruit a team of seven (or fewer) – Taken from: “Sprint”, pp. 34-35

  1. Decider – Examples: CEO, founder, product manager, head of design
  2. Finance expert – Examples: CEO, CFO, business development manager
  3. Marketing expert – Examples: CMO, marketer, PR, community manager
  4. Customer expert – Examples: researcher, sales, customer support
  5. Tech/logistics expert – Examples: CTO, engineer
  6. Design expert  Examples: designer, product manager

Main learning point: I recommend everyone doing a ‘sprint’ before committing to a specific solution. “Sprint” is a great book, with a lot of helpful guideance as to how to best solve big problems in five days. I’d argue that some of the techniques to use as part of sprint shouldn’t be constrained to a 5-day period or at the start of a piece work; I’ll outline in the coming posts how some of the sprint exercises can be used on a continuous basis.

 

Sprint 2

 

 

Related links for further learning:

  1. http://www.gv.com/sprint/
  2. https://sprintstories.com/